On the Subject of GM Salmon

Genetically modified salmon has recently been given the metaphorical green light by the Food and Drug Administration.  There is no requirement mandating proper labeling of this genetically modified salmon; however, the FDA has floated the idea that the salmon may be labeled optionally.  If this optional labeling were to take place, it would appear as though each seafood corporation could make its own decision regarding the level of detail that they will provide their consumers regarding the manner in which their salmon was raised (Pollack).

Purdue University Professor William Muir, a proponent of GM salmon, says that “the current practice of using wild caught salmon as a food source is not sustainable; our oceans are overfished.”  Additionally, Professor Muir states that “this development provides a safe and sustainable alternative.”  Conversely, opponents of genetically modified salmon are concerned about the health of wild salmon if the GM salmon were to escape from their confinement (Pollack).

At this time, I am opposed to the genetic engineering of salmon.  Yes, I am disappointed with the haphazard proposals, if we can even call them that, for labeling GM salmon.  Yes, I am doubtful that the GM salmon will never escape their confinement- and I am skeptical about what their escape means for the reproductive success of wild salmon.  Nevertheless, the aspect of this controversy that I find most perplexing is that genetic engineering has become an increasingly acceptable, even expected, aspect of our food system.  Does the future of our food system look like genetically modified… everything?

I look forward to hearing your opinion on this matter!

Until Next Week… Plan Well, Pack Well, Live Well,

Katie 🙂

Works Cited

Pollack, Andrew. “Genetically Engineered Salmon Approved for Consumption.” New York Times. 19 Nov. 2015: The New York Times Company. Web. 28 Nov. 2015. <http://www.nytimes.com/2015/11/20/business/genetically-engineered-salmon-approved-for-consumption.html?_r=0>

Advertisements

Happy Thanksgiving!

I’d like to begin this week’s post with a shout-out to all of the families who visited “Project Lunchbox: Let’s Eat!”at Howe Manning School’s Get Moving Night this past Friday evening.  It was a pleasure to meet you and to dialogue with you about all things nutrition!  I hope that you benefitted from our discussion about organic versus conventionally grown produce and how to maximize your organic food budget.  Please do not hesitate to contact me with any further questions via the “Comment” section of this site, as I am thrilled that you have become official subscribers to my “Let’s Eat Lunch!” Blog.  Thank you for your interest!

Secondly, Thanksgiving Day is less than a week away!  And, since I adore tradition, it has become standard practice for me to post a favorite quote of mine at this time of the year that sums up the upcoming holiday and its true meaning:

“None is more impoverished than the one who has no gratitude.  Gratitude is a currency that we can mint for ourselves, and spend without fear of bankruptcy.”

-Fred De Witt Van Amburgh

This year in particular I am grateful for many things, and among them, I am thankful for your continued support of “Project Lunchbox: Let’s Eat!” and its mission to educate families about the link between healthy eating and positive school performance.  I am truly appreciative that you take time out of your week to read my blog additions, ask questions, and start conversations about nutrition, food justice, and wellness on this site.  Your enthusiastic participation makes teaching and writing such a joy for me!

I hope that you and yours enjoy a very Happy Thanksgiving!

Until Next Week… Plan Well, Pack Well, Live Well,

Katie 🙂

 

 

Everything in Moderation… Or Not?

After conducting a nutritional study alongside researchers hailing from the University of Texas and Tufts University, Dr. Dariush Mozaffarian, Dean of the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy (at Tufts) concluded that “these results suggest that in modern diets, eating ‘everything in moderation’ is actually worse than eating a smaller number of healthy foods.”  The goal of this study was to measure how human consumption of a diverse array of foods affects both waist circumference and metabolic health.  During the study, the diets of 6,814 Americans were recorded.  In particular, the differences between the amounts of sodium, trans-fats, fiber, and calories were documented, as well as the actual quantity of foods that the participants ate over periods of seven days.  Throughout the first five years of the study, researchers examined quantitatively how waist circumference varies with consumption of particular foods.  Next, researchers recorded the number of participants in the study who had acquired Type 2 Diabetes following a ten year interval (Smith).

Unfortunately, both the acquisition of disease and weight gain were discovered to be prevalent among participants who had consumed a diet consisting of a vast array of different food options.  Assistant Professor at the University of Texas School of Public Health stated “An unexpected finding was that participants with greater diversity in their diets, as measured by dissimilarity, actually had worse diet quality.  They were eating less healthy foods, such as fruits and vegetables, and more unhealthy foods, such as processed meats, desserts, and soda.  This may help explain the relationship between greater food dissimilarity and increased waist circumference.” (Smith).

It appears as though moderation is losing face.  How could this be?  What do you think about the relationship between diet diversity and health, as examined in this study?

Until Next Week… Plan Well, Pack Well, Live Well,

Katie 🙂

Works Cited

Smith, Steve. “Variety is Key?  For Healthy, Balanced Diet, A Uniform Food Routine May Be Best.” Medical Daily. 2 Nov. 2015: Medical Daily. Web. 8 Nov. 2015. <http://www.medicaldaily.com/variety-key-healthy-balanced-diet-uniform-food-routine-may-be-best-359888>

Let’s Talk (#5)

“The hunger for love is much more difficult to remove than the hunger for bread.”

–Mother Teresa

It seems to me as though this quote speaks to our need for emotional nourishment, not just physical sustenance.  Can food extend beyond a form of physical sustenance into a realm of emotional nourishment, depending on the people that it is shared with?

Until Next Week… Plan Well, Pack Well, Live Well,

Katie 🙂